Richard Priest is a design-focused Architect offering a product of the highest quality. His style of architecture leans towards the contemporary, but also allows the site and client brief to direct the development of any project.

Richard describes the site at Vunabaka as the best he's ever seen.

Richard describes the site at Vunabaka as the best he's ever seen. It has every element you could ask for on a tropical island; a stunning sandy bay, welcoming marina, varied elevation, original rainforest, and a generous fresh water aquifer. The site is graciously oriented to capture dazzling sunsets and is protected from the trade winds in an amphitheater like setting.

“What struck me about this particular project is that it offered much more than any other luxury tropical island development. For starters the only way to get around is by boat so you get an immediate sense of island life, but more than that this, Vunabaka becomes a sanctuary. The hidden harbour that is created behind the main beach emphasizes the significant natural land forms and the fauna that surrounds it culminating at the rainforest and the Baka tree.This in turn leads up to the natural water spring from which flows a fresh water swimming lagoon, beautiful rainforest walks, and other related activity areas. Importantly, the tree was a meeting place for people on the island and has a spiritual significance that underlies its size.”

The intent of the architecture is to emulate the Fijian vernacular in the design of both the villas and the settlement itself.

The intent of the architecture is to emulate the Fijian vernacular in the design of both the villas and the settlement itself. Construction of simple pavilions connected by covered walkways gives emphasis to both the outdoor spaces and to the wider environs.

“It is important to design that which is appropriate for both the site and the environment and in this way the architecture at Vunabaka is a response to both. I wanted the development as a whole to appear as any village in Fiji would from the water . And as you get closer to the building and as you inhabit the pavilions the aesthetic, while remaining honest, becomes more refined.”